Connecticut law definining who can perform marriages

I believe that Connecticut’s marriage officiant law is discriminatory to minority faiths and I’ve started a project to change it. What is the current law? Section 46b-22 of the Connecticut General Statutes defines who is allowed to solemnize a marriage: all judges and retired judges, either elected or appointed, including federal judges and judges of other states who may legally join persons in marriage in their jurisdictions, family support magistrates, family support referees, state referees and justices of the peace who are appointed in Connecticut, and all ordained or licensed members of the clergy, belonging to this state or any other state. And though it’s only mentioned in annotations of the law, court precedent from the Connecticut Supreme Court of[…]

After returning home from a five day Heathen utopia, I have a lot to unpack even after all my things are put away. When I first cautiously mentioned to my wife that there was something of a Heathen summer camp held every year, I wasn’t sure I wanted to go. I perpetually have a sort of imposter syndrome when it comes to my religious practices. Do I practice enough? Do I know enough about my gods? Am I offering to enough gods? Will I say the right things during group ritual? Do I know enough of “the Lore” or the theological principles that underpin my faith? And if I’m being honest with myself, the answer to all of those questions[…]

My Unitarian Universalist church has several lay-led services each year. I was asked to speak during a recent Sunday service on Resolutions. My speech, with some minor editing, is produced below. I set a goal for myself last year. Well two goals actually, but I’ll start with this one. Of course, I didn’t set them for January 1st, because as an Elder Millennial I considered it edgy to reject the #NewYearNewMe resolution setting culture. This goal came up more organically shortly after my birthday. After finding a new spiritual community online and having a helpful conversation with our minister, I decided that I was going to really live the 4th UU principle. That’s the one about “a free and responsible[…]

I started this blog years ago with the intent of chronicling my spiritual journey. With a flourish, I typed up a self-important post regaling my readers (of whom there were none) the glorious history of my religious beliefs: from Catholic, to agnostic, to “Neopagan agnostic.” Towards the end I state the the following:

My specific views on a “higher power” could be called panentheistic. I view “God/Diety/the Devine” as the eternal force, rather than an anthropomorphized man-like entity, that exists behind the universe. It has both traditionally male and female characteristics. I also see every god or goddess believed in to be a human representation of some aspect of “the Devine” though my Christian roots compel me to call this eternal force “God.”

Sigh.

I now cringe at the text I wrote in 2010. I cringe, not because the beliefs are ignorant, but because it’s ignorant to attempt describing one of the most difficult aspects of one’s being using words for which you only have a cursory grasp.